dreaming softly

wewerenotthefirst:

dude, what if a prince is cursed to be a dragon but instead of being upset by it, they’re like ‘hell yeah i’m a dragon’ and they spend weeks finding the perfect decrepit castle to haunt and try to convince their fiancé to be a princess in the tower ‘just for like a week’ and everyone is like ‘we can break the fucking curse’ and the prince is like ‘but i’m a dragon.’

(via cupofbrownsugar)

1. Your skin may never be perfect, and that’s okay.

2. Life is too short not to have the underwear, the coffee, and the haircut you want.

3. Everyone (including your family, your coworkers, and your best friend) will talk about you behind your back, and you’ll talk about them too. It doesn’t mean you don’t love each other.

4. It’s okay to spend money on things that make you happy.

5. Sometimes without fault or reason, relationships deteriorate. It will happen when you’re six, it will happen when you’re sixty. That’s life.

—Five things I am trying very hard to accept. (via leunq)

(Source: aumoe, via ladyflowdi)

African-Americans and Asian Americans are more enthusiastic moviegoers than white American audiences. Hispanic audiences account for 20% or more of opening weekend ticket sales for blockbuster movies in the U.S. Women account for 52% of the moviegoing audience, and major releases with female leads keep upsetting expectations — like Scarlet Johanssen’s Lucy, which smashed Dwayne Johnson’s Hercules at the box office. On top of all that, the international audience for movies is more important than ever before, with almost 70% of studio revenues coming from foreign markets.
Disney is clearly switched on about all of this, and it’s easy to see that understanding reflected in the decision to cast black actors John Boyega and Lupita Nyong’o in key roles in the next Star Wars movie, and Gwendoline Christie in a role reportedly written for a man. That all goes some way to addressing the sci-fi franchise’s historic shortage of women and people of color. It’s also evident in the decision to adapt Marvel’s Big Hero 6 with a diverse cast — though sadly at the expense of several Asian characters. It’s notable that Disney Animation, rather than Marvel Studios, saw the potential in that property, and the feature carries no Marvel branding whatsoever.

This appreciation for a changing audience isn’t limited to movies. One only need look at another Disney subsidiary to see the importance Disney attaches to female and non-white audiences.
Disney’s ABC television network is launching three sitcoms this fall with minority casts, as well as the first sitcom to feature an Asian American as the romantic lead (Selfie). ABC has given a whole night of primetime programming to a black woman, writer/producer Shonda Rimes, with two of her three hours led by black female leads. Dramas with female leads have done very well for the network — with Once Upon A Time and Scandal as standout examples — and all the successful dramas launched by ABC in the last couple of years have featured black leading characters except Nashville and Marvel’s Agents of SHIELD.
Even ABC Family, once known as an evangelical Christian network, has weirdly become home to some of the most inclusive shows on television, like the queer-friendly Pretty Little Liars and The Fosters.
Come to that, another Disney-owned company has made impressive strides with diversity in just the past year, launching its highest ever number of series with female leads and people of color, and integrating significant LGBT content into its output. That company is of course Marvel. Marvel Comics, that is; not Marvel Studios.

I don’t know if all of this is the result of a Disney-wide initiative to improve diversity within its output, or if it’s simply writers and commissioning editors taking advantage of the fact that the changing market means less resistance at the top. I suspect it’s a little of both. What’s clear is that Marvel Studios has not taken advantage of that change with the same rapidity. It hasn’t anticipated that change, and it hasn’t left itself in a position to quickly adapt to that change.

The Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution abolished slavery and involuntary servitude, except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

Think about who’s in jail and why. 

(via amerikkkan-stories)

and that “crime” could be anything they felt like charging you with

(via boygeorgemichaelbluth)

This was how the myth of Black criminality started, for the record. After the abolition of slavery, a lot of states made laws targeting Black people specifically, and then put them on chain gangs to get free labor from them.

Oh, and the US is still disproportionately incarcerating Black people and private prisons are making huge amounts off them.

(via bunnybotbaby)

This is one of those pieces of information I wish had like 200 million notes on tumblr.

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

meanwhile the dea teamed up with the cca

(via cxnfvsed-and-cxnflicted)

Yeah, I believe that black people are twice as likely to be arrested and convicted for committing the same crimes as a white person. Draw your own conclusions.

(via yesiamtheblack)

Reblogging this because everytime in real life I’ve said Slavery didn’t really end I’ve been dismissed as crazy.

(via locsgirl)

I’ll reblog this every time it comes up on my dash. People need to know!

(via andshegotthegirl)

All of this.

(via thisiseverydayracism)

This week of summer camp is the American Revolution.  I just printed out the Preamble and the Bill of Rights, skimming the rest of the amendments for my amusement.

It stopped being amusing once I got to the 13th and started raging about the prison industrial complex we have in this country.

The kids (all girls) are only 8 and 9, but damn did they notice the irony of “all men are created equal” in the Declaration.  Too bad no one signed up for our Civil War week.

(via misandry-mermaid)

(via tsukinofaerii)

detrea:

The premise of minimum wage, when it was introduced, was that a single wage earner should be able to own a home and support a family.  That was what it was based on; a full time job, any job, should be able to accomplish this.

The fact people scoff at this idea if presented nowadays, as though the people that ring up your groceries or hand you your burgers don’t deserve the luxury of a home and a family, is disgusting.

(via mkyujji)